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Tópico: Santa Cruz 29er Tallboy LT

  1. #11
    Domina as técnicas de queda Avatar de cmbo
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    SURFAS, tenho a pedaleira de origem com dois pratos 24/38 dentes, mas não quero dizer que sinto necessidade de colocar a 22 dentes, o que quis dizer foi que em subidas e em especial se forem bastante inclinadas, se por algum motivo tivermos que abrandar, custa mais a "acelarar"! mas não é nada que me preocupe.

  2. #12
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  3. #13
    Trata por tu os "desmontas" Avatar de Poeira
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    Sim senhor, mas uma bela maquina para o pessoal dos trilhos empinados ao contrário. Esta será mesmo à tua medida SURFAS. Pode ser que o César tenha lá, depois, uma para tu testares.
    Boas pedaladas.
    Poeira

  4. #14
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    Se me saísse o euromilhões era esta amarela com umas jantes de carbono Easton.

    Até já tenho trilho para a estrear

    Última edição de SURFAS : 16-04-2012 às 07:45
    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  5. #15
    Já saca os pneus à mão Avatar de Pernalonga
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    Mais uma fotos da LT 29er.





    Última edição de Pernalonga : 17-04-2012 às 19:44
    Boas pedaladas. De SANTACRUZ, claro...

  6. #16
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    A Speedgoat já recebeu uma e andou a testar, com rodas carbono Enve, vejamos ...

    First Ride: Santa Cruz Tallboy LT

    New bike releases are not taken lightly at Santa Cruz, and rightfully so – when the Tallboy Carbon hit the market a few years ago it instantly won over even the hardest of hard-tail enthusiasts. The geometry was perfect. The frame was among the lightest in its class. The handling and ride made you feel (and go) fast whether you were on a race course or riding messier, more aggressive terrain. It was, in every way, more than just a ‘me too’ bike thrown at the consumer to fill a gap in their product line – it became THE bike to own if you craved all of the BEST aspects of a mountain bike with 29 inch wheels. But, for many riders, the only thing it’s been lacking is a touch more travel. Not anymore. Meet the new Tallboy LT.


    On a recent visit to Santa Cruz, I was treated to a 4-hr test ride on the new Tallboy LT Carbon. In those 4-hours, we covered every possible terrain you could imagine: twisty singletrack, hour-long climbs that break your legs and burst your lungs, mile-long ocean-view descents, and a dozen or so short and steep downhill runs that you could swear were straight out of a world cup event. The last time I rode here, I was on board a Blur TRC – a 26” bike with 5.5 inches of travel – which, is what I’m used to riding because I’ve logged hundreds of backwoods miles on a TRC, and I’ve got a BMC TF01 with 5.9 inches of cushion back home. I’m mostly a roadie, so a long-travel bike like the TF01 is a ton of fun when a trail ride starts to take an all-mountain bent, but as the travel on those bikes increases – so does the weight. And, the shaved-leg calorie counter in me starts to get a little skeptical about how a bike will perform when the weight creeps past the 25-pound mark, especially when the trail points toward the heavens.


    So, when I showed up for a Tallboy LT test ride in Santa Cruz I was equally skeptical. I surveyed my bike for the day – a fresh-out-of-the-box screaming yellow Tallboy LT Carbon with a full XTR drivetrain and a locking Shadow Plus rear derailleur (yes, it silenced chain slap as promised - which was really, really nice), ENVE wheels, slightly beefy Maxxis Ardent tires, and a Rockshox Reverb post. A top-notch build, no doubt. I was definitely expecting a bike that went downhill like Missy Giove (yes, that’s a deliberate double entendre), and that climbed like the Stay-Puft Marshmallow Man. I was also expecting school-bus like handling on tight uphill switchbacks, that is, if I could actually manage to keep pedaling through them on this heavy, sluggish, lumbering beast. Yep, that’s what I was expecting. What I got was something completely UN-expected: a cross-country bike in an all-mountain wrapper.


    Now, before I tell you about the ride itself, let’s back up and talk about the tech behind the new long-travel version of the carbon Tallboy. That means a quick trip to the inner sanctum of the Santa Cruz R&D department and test lab. Santa Cruz’s HQ is an old cannery, and it’s made up of several buildings with wide concrete driveways in-between. There are also long, unlit breezeways running through each building. To get to the lab, you walk down one of these caves to a black door marked “17C”. There’s no ‘Employees Only’ or ‘Secret Test Lab’ or ‘Research and Development’ signs anywhere – it’s just a big black door. Behind door 17C are three rooms connected by cut-outs in the wall – the machine shop, the lab, and the space where the R&D guys store and assemble all of their prototypes and “mules” (mules are aluminum frames welded together as templates which closely mimic the ‘new bike’ they’re currently developing. We caught a sneak peek at a few of them, but the engineers were pretty tight-lipped about what they’d become when they were pushed into final production.


    Most importantly, we caught a glimpse of the inside of a Santa Cruz carbon fiber frame, and we got to see the guts of some of their competitor’s frames as well. The take away? Santa Cruz has invested a lot of time and effort to be sure there are no voids, no creases, and no weaknesses or inconsistencies on the insides of their carbon tubes. They don’t leave behind any foam or pieces of the inflatable bladder that’s used to compress the tubes into the molds during carbon fiber production. The benefit? Pure quality control: My Tallboy carbon will ride like your Tallboy carbon, and your Tallboy carbon will ride like your buddy’s. They’ll be equally stiff and equally durable, no matter which size or year model you own.


    The most important discovery we made behind door 17D was that there’s a brand new rear triangle that was sculpted especially for the Tallboy LT Carbon. That’s right – they didn’t just throw a longer fork and shock on the Tallboy – this frame and rear triangle are completely new, and made from totally different molds. The first feature is what the guys called the “MUT” which stands for “Massive Upright Technology.” When you compare the non-drive side of the rear triangles from the Tallboy and the Tallboy LT, you notice that the carbon that runs from the lower link to the upper pivot is, well, massive when compared to the standard Tallboy. You’ll also notice that the hole for the upper pivot hardware looks almost drilled out, as opposed to sitting on top of it like a semi-detached knuckle. By wrapping the carbon from the upright fully around the upper pivot hardware, Santa Cruz was able to provide a massive increase in rear-end stiffness – not only does the MUT keep the whole triangle from flexing torsionally, but it also eliminates flex where the shock mount meets the upper pivot because there’s just a helluva lot more material there.




    Of course, another nice upgrade is the standard 12mm x 142mm thru axle - but the slickest feature of the new back-end are the derailleur hanger options – Santa Cruz will offer two, one of which is offset just enough to make rear wheel removal about a thousand times easier (it’s kicked back behind the axle, which keeps the wheel from getting all caught up in the chain/derailleur/brake when removing and reinstalling).


    OK, enough tech. Let’s talk about the ride.

    If you’re going for a mountain bike ride in Santa Cruz, California, then you have to pay a cover charge before you get to the trailhead. Now, you don’t have to actually hand some dude in a tollbooth a sawbuck, but you *do* have to climb for a good two to three miles to get to the really good stuff – and that’s a price of admission I’m willing to pay to ride in the fabled “Demo Woods” on trails like Star Wars, Two Tanks, and Mail Boxes Etc. Fortunately, the initial climb on this ride was a perfectly-smooth two to three percent climb alongside a set of railroad tracks that carry the seasonal sight-seeing train.

    I reached down, locked out the Fox F34 140 fork, set the RP23 shock to ProPedal mode, and decided to sit on the ride leader’s wheel for a bit.


    And, that’s when it hit me – the Tallboy LT Carbon doesn’t know it’s an all-mountain bike. We were in the big ring, toward the top of the cassette, just spinning. No grinding, no laboring, just spinning about 90 RPM like we were on the flats. Surely, I thought, when I stand up to stretch out my legs and back this bike’s gonna pogo like a low-rider. So, I dropped the chain two cogs closer to the bottom, stood up, cranked it and started wrenching on the bars. Nothing. It didn’t flinch. Sure, there was a little bouncy-bouncy, but the VPP suspension combined with the RP23 made for an ultra-stable pedaling platform whether I was standing up mashing or sitting down and spinning.

    It took us about 45 minutes to get to the ‘real’ trailhead, and from that point on – we were REALLY climbing. I’m not talking about 5% inclined fire roads – I’m talking about loamy, twisty singletrack with the occasional root and rock garden and hairpin section pitching anywhere from 10% to the upper teens, and maybe beyond. And the roots were from giant redwood and cedar trees, not a 12” wide pine tree. Serious granny gear territory. Serious hard tail territory.

    But the Tallboy LT took it all in stride.

    No matter what gear I found myself in, and no matter how light I spun or hard I mashed, for the next two hours of climbing I slowly but surely fell for the Tallboy LTC. In addition to easily conquering some tough climbing, the bike was quite agile when the trail narrowed or obstacles popped up in my path. Any last-second corrections in my line were rewarded with sure-footed grip and predictable handling. Even as I threw it at some of the worst lines on the trail, and bounced off and over some big roots and rocks, it stayed planted. And then, about two hours later, the trail finally pointed down. And, yours truly got a first-hand lesson in when to use a dropper post.

    If I’m forced to answer, I’m more roadie than mountain biker. I’ve been mountain biking since college – roughly 20 years – and I’ve ridden all of the hot spots in the US (Moab, Fruita, Austin, Phoenix, Marin County). But, because it’s more convenient and you get more bang for the buck when training, most of my miles are logged on a road bike. That means I’ve not cultivated my position on the mountain bike, and I run a bit of a high saddle. When you combine that high saddle with big ass wheels, a frame with a high standover, about 20 bike shop guys racing like they’re pros, and a section of trail that has you in the air more than on the ground, it’s a recipe for disaster. So, as the speed increased the jumps started to come faster and faster, and with every jump I was pulling up on the front end later and later. Eventually, it caught up with me and sent me careening off the trail like a bucking bronco, headed straight for the stump of a gigantic ex-redwood tree.

    Fortunately, I saved it, but I definitely got a few laughs from the guys behind me. When we stopped, one of my new buddies said: “Dude. Use the Reverb. Drop that sh*t on the next section.” I did, and my inner child was set free. Remote drop posts are to mountain biking what clipless pedals were to road biking 25 years ago. They’re that big of a game changer, and I had no CLUE how something that simple could alter the handling of a bicycle. I’ll never leave home without one again; on a wild and wooly downhill section, it makes the bike about ten times more manageable. Once I got used to the position of the remote thumb lever, I was dropping that post like a pro.


    So, the ride went on, and after another thousand feet of climbing we hit a totally exposed fire road with a view of the ocean, and soft-pedaled the last few miles back to Santa Cruz. That gave me time to reflect on my last 4 hours of riding, which sent me back to my last three or four years of mountain biking. I realized that in that time, I’d done zero races, and showed up for a total of one group mountain bike ride, but that I’d also done some pretty epic alpine rides and managed to traverse some gigantic mountains in the desert all by myself. And then I connected the dots in my head – the Tallboy LT, whether carbon or aluminum, is the kind of bike that reminds you why you don’t race anymore. It’s the kind of bike that makes you WANT to ride every day, or at least as often as possible. It’s a bike that makes it OK to just pedal along in zone 1 by yourself and enjoy the contours of the earth. Could you race it? Sure. But, it’s not a racer’s bike. It’s a rider’s bike that’s built for high or low-speed cruising and BLASTING down hills. But, for the ex-racer in me that likes to throttle it every once in a while (especially uphill or in the rollers), it’s far from being a slouch. Quite the contrary – it climbs NOTICEABLY better than lighter 26 inch bikes I’ve owned with DW and Horst Links.

    I got up the next morning and thought, “It couldn’t have been that good. It must’ve been the ENVE wheels and all the high-end components that made that thing ride so great.” That’s right, still skeptical. Maybe it was all just a dream. But, then I hopped on board the Aluminum version with a Shimano XT build for a two hour loop on some steeper and *more technical* trails and had darn near the same experience: excellent climbing no matter what the pitch or position (seated or standing), rock-solid stability in light of last minute corrections, and nimble handling on even the twisty-est stuff.


    Sure, it felt a bit heavier, but for the $1000 savings, it's a toss up as to which I'd choose. I think that if I had a craving for a long-travel all-mountain bike, I’d be hard-pressed to find a better build than a Tallboy LT Aluminum with XT or X0 and a set of ENVE or Reynolds carbon XC wheels.

    One thing’s for sure, though: whatever I build, it’s gonna have a telescoping post!
    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  7. #17
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    Xiiii parece Monsanto

    Última edição de SURFAS : 19-04-2012 às 10:57
    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  8. #18
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    É mesmo finalmente!! Uso Mavic Crossmax desde 2002 e à 2 anos testei a Tallboy com as C29Max que se equipavam às Crossmax ST, mas a nível de rigidez nada parecido, era apenas uma ST com um aro de 29"!!

    Podem ler aqui a pesquisa feita pela Mavic afim de proceder a umas rodas 29" afim do nome Crossmax.



    " Mavic had planned a Crossmax SLR 29 last summer as a 2012 product, but development took longer than they thought so the launch was delayed until now. Initial prototypes simply made a 29er version of the Crossmax, but it was flexy and weak.

    Mavic’s engineers said there’s a cubic decrease in stiffness as diameter grows. So, a 29er wheel would be about 39% less stiff than a similarly built 26″ wheel. A 29er wheel also has 40% more inertia, and spokes have a lower frequency but higher intensity stress, which can affect reliability. These are the challenges, skip through to see how they overcame them and more…

    They tested more spokes (24 rather than 20), which fixed stiffness but added weight. They also tried stronger spokes and keeping it at 20 spokes, and that gave them the strength they wanted with minimal weight increase. But, in both cases, they noticed cracks appearing in the rim.

    Interestingly, Cannondale test riders were saying that with 24 spokes, the wheel was more comfortable because spoke tension could be lower. With 20 spokes it was harder, stiffer and faster. That translates to racier, and that’s what they preferred.

    The solution was to increase the thickness of the rim’s sidewall extrusion by 0.6mm. It’s a surprisingly small amount of extra material, but it solved the cracking problem. They also adjusted their ISM 3D milling from what’s done on the 26″ rim to balance strength with weight savings. Great, right? Not yet, this led to driveside radial lacing spokes breaking. They fixed this by giving only those spokes a special bead blasting treatment that increased strength without adding weight. After all this, the wheels held up in their field and lab tests.

    Claimed weight for the new Crossmax SLR 29 is 1620g (755g front / 865g rear). Hubs work with all standards – Front 9/15 and rear 9/12 x 135/142 and they’ll come with all axle adapters in the box. And, as spied earlier, there’s a Lefty version, too! Spokes are their Zicral bladed spokes. Should be available in early June. $999.90 msrp.



    While the SLR presented the most technical challenges because it had to be super lightweight to live up to expectations, the ST needed to be strong since it’s aimed at the All Mountain category. Surprisingly, Mavic says very little special features were needed to grow the wheel from their 26″ version and it still exceeds all of their test standards. It uses the same hubs as the SLR, the differences are that the rims don’t get the ISM 3D treatment, just basic ISM, and their round Zicral spokes with 24 front and 20 rear. So, while the weight difference between the two sets isn’t massive, but it’s rotational weight so the difference in feel should be more dramatic than the numbers may imply.

    Claimed weight is 1710g (825 front / 885 rear) and it works with all axle standards, including Lefty and a 20mm front thru axle…something the SLR doesn’t have, but they come set up for 15mm thru axle front and other front axle adapters are available aftermarket. This and the Crossride 29 should be available in the fall around Eurobike time (late August/early September). $824.90 msrp.



    The Crossride brings Mavic’s wheels to the masses. Claimed weight is 2020g thanks to reinforced rims for the larger wheel size. It uses standard spokes and nipples and downgrades to their TS-2 two-pawl engagement system. But it’s only $299.90 MSRP. It comes with 15mm front axle and 10mm QR. Other axle adapters are available separately.

    Rim width is 19mm inside on all three. The SLR and SL are available in either 6-bolt or Centerlock disc brake hubs. The Crossride is only available in 6-bolt.
    COMPARISONS & ACTUAL WEIGHTS


    2013 Mavic Crossmax SLR actual weights: 755g front, 882g rear (with quick release axle endcaps).


    2013 Mavic Crossmax ST actual weights: 831g front, 893g rear (with 15mm thru front, quick release rear axle endcaps).


    2013 Mavic Crossride Disc 29er actual weights: 831g front, 893g rear (with 15mm thru front, quick release rear axle endcaps).
    "
    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  9. #19
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    Agora foi a vez da Mountainbike magazine

    Long-travel 29ers, once ridiculed for frames that weren’t quite stiff enough, keep improving, and Santa Cruz’s new Tallboy LTc is one of the best we’ve seen of this new generation. Built around a stiff, lightweight carbon frame with 135mm of travel, the bike tracked predictably down descents strewn with rocks and ripped through technical sections. More surprising, it flew up climbs and accelerated with snap on rolling singletrack.



    A dropper post gets your saddle out of the way.

    The 142mm thru-axle adds only a little more stiffness to the bike than a QR would, thanks to the very stiff swingarm, but it accepts more wheel options.

    Plenty of clearance at the stays leaves room for even the fattest tires; a bent seat tube means the stays can be as short as possible.

    Santa Cruz tweaked the VPP linkage to make room for ISCG tabs.

    ISCG 05 tabs let you mount a chainguide system, essential for aggressive riding.

    Each pivot’s angular contact bearings and preload are adjustable via an 8mm hex bolt, then locked in place by an external 6mm hex bolt.

    Santa Cruz stiffened the rear triangle with what it playfully refers to as a MUT (Mega Upright Technology) bridge that more directly connects the two pivots.

    A short head tube keeps the handlebar low.
    Última edição de SURFAS : 28-04-2012 às 18:13
    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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  10. #20
    Se pedalares como falas... Avatar de SURFAS
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    Em acção no Shore

    Ande sempre no trilho.
    Não deixe marcas da sua passagem.
    Mantenha sua bicicleta sob controle.
    Preste atenção em quem vem atrás e dê sempre passagem.
    Tenha cuidado com o meio ambiente e não assuste os animais.


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